From Servant to friends, to sons


John 15:15
KJV:Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you.


Hallelujah, Our Level don change!
The job of a servant/slave is just to do the will of his Master. In everything the servant is to always seek to please his Master in respect and honor. While is friend knows the master. His strength, weakness, likes and dislikes.
But a son, a son is the owner it all, the sons enjoys everything the master has without restrictions. From the point where we surrender and submit all to our Lord, then we come boldly to our Father without fear or favour.


Jesus speaking to his disciples says we are not just his servants/slaves. But now he has called us friends and bestowed us all his riches in power and glory.


As friends never hide things from each other, so has Jesus made us his friends to always know and walk in the will of God. Now, we are joint heirs(sons) with Christ, showin g the character of Christ as He keeps leading daily to the Father.

God bless you

She is not your enemy!

Don’t give the devil a chance.
1 Peter 5:8
[8]Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.


The plans of the devil has always been to thwart the agenda of God for your life. He comes to steal your joy, kill your faith and destroy your convictions through wickedness, because he knows that God has only the best in stored for you. Thank God we are not ignorant of his devices, but for many we fail to see this cunny agenda of the devil, and instead choose to fight the wrong enemy thinking we are solving the problem not knowing we are making it worse.


One day I had a misunderstanding with my younger brother and before you could say Jack Robinson, the small misunderstanding had escalated to a big issue, emotional as I am as a result that day I couldn’t pray as usual, I felt very sad.
It was later that the holy Spirit whispered to me that I was looking at the wrong enemy, I was hesitant to admit it because everything points to the fact that I was clearly misunderstood. It was clear and simple, “Humans is not your enemy!” And that is what most of us do. Like me, we are always carried away with the situation trying to how best to deal with it. Human beings are not your enemy.


When I later discovered what the devil had planned for my family, I stopped all and stood to up pray. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.(Ephesians 6:12)


We have pampered the devil enough, RESIST THE DEVIL, it is time to uphold our weapons of warfare, for the weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds. [2 Corinthians 10:4]


Our sure way of defeating him for us hit the rod while it’s still hot and that is to RESIST THE DEVIL and he will runaway from us. For we have overcome by the blood of Jesus Christ.

God bless you.

LAMP

Lightening the giant hidden, lost vision now appearing slimmer. 
Letting light loose it's radiance,
limping on it's carrier,
like a spoon, cannot cut an animal's fragrance.
Agonized by the voice, she dwindles, 
Accrued to the war within,
against all odds she stands,
Alerting the gatekeepers of her win.
Master of all, strikes, Ministrel monstrously emerges, 
Minuting her awakening in twinkles, Measured success by the weight of her mind.
Poisoning sweets, 
Painting light her feets,
Possessed by her past
Poised as a frienemy yet so kind,
Piping the shades of memory now cast.

LAMP written by Timbushi Eunice Glandu

You are a priest forever

Psalm 110:4 The Lord has sworn and will not change his mind: “You are a priest forever, in the order of Melchizedek.”


The Lord called us into a kingdom of priests and Kings. And for every king there’s definitely a domain where he resides. God’s agenda was as a priest we establish his domain through our personal alters through out the earth. Where are the priests?


The agenda of God is that through your role as a priest in that family he breaks forth his presence in power and might. Through your consistent fellowship (prayer or study), God finds expression in your earth. Where are the priests?
You have slept enough and nothing is changing, you are being too careless with your destiny,when God wants to bring out a warriors out of you, you have played too long, you have eaten too much, enough is enough! Priests must Arise!

You are a king

You’re a priest


You need to arise as the priest that God has ordained you. And your priesthood starts from your family. Start by praying for and with your family. Take your stand for your loved ones because that is your number one assignment in life. Priests must Arise! Until His kingdom come.


God bless you.


	

Thank God!!!


Ephesians 5:20
[20]always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.


From the beginning of the year till the very moment, many people have committed suicide, some died of hunger and the fear accompanied with the Corona Virus. We say thank you Lord.


Some lost their dear lives in the EndSars peaceful protest that later turned into a massacre. We say thank you Lord.


Even when the inflation is causing hunger strike everywhere and we don’t know where or how to source for the next meal, we say thank you Lord. We say thank God not only when things are going well, even when you are hurting, we say thank God. Even when you don’t understand why, or where things are heading, still, thank God


Even when everything is going well with us, we say thank you.
I personally don’t know how miracles and done, how the death are brought back to life, or how the sick;lame, blind, paralyzed receives instant restoration and revitalization, and all these and many more you have done and still doing, we say thank you Lord.


For your faithfulness and mercies, thank you Jesus.
As we step out, we say thank you Lord. As we return, we say thank you.
In all your ways acknowledge him and appreciate him because everything He does is for your good. By praising God we move his majestic presence into our lives, he will do much more if we thank Him. Thank him for his presence,his beauty, his loving kindness unworthy as we are he chose us. Psalm 34:1 says I will extol the Lord at all times; his praise will always be on my lips. If you have not doing so begin today to appreciate Him

Where is your Treasure


Matthew 6:20-21
[20]But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal.
[21]For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.


Jesus told the rich man who came to inquire of him what to do to be saved Mark 10:21

Jesus looked at him saying, “One thing you lack,” he said. “Go, sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”


Jesus said this not because he wants the money for anything but it was to put away the rich man’s heart from his earthly treasure back to God. Your heart is God’s most treasured asset, because out of your hearts proceeds the issues of life.
Your heart is automatically intertwined with what you esteem the highest in your life. Whether your treasure is set on your ability to find money, become rich and famous, or is your treasure tied to your family’s, it will all pass.


The Lord God is one and you cannot either serve him with your all your heart. Coming to your time and priority, there’s no room at the door of your heart for two, it’s either money or God. You cannot serve both.
The wise don’t store up money in their Bank, they actually entrust it to God knowing fully well, we are only caretakers not owners of anything and set the treasures of their hearts to God.


Colossians 3:1-2
[1]Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.
[2]Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.


Mary was a specular example when according to the gospel account of Luke 2:19 “But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart.”
See, she treasured Jesus’ words and kept them. Where have you placed God’s word? Do you just read to boast about it or you feed on it like an hungry man? Do you make his words a standard for your life or it’s just a story book or dictionary to you?
You are now one with Christ so your focus should not be food or money driven it should be centred on Him.

Your heart and mind should be synchronized with the move of God.
Your hunger and passion shouldn’t be based on material things(although all these are necessary)but we set our hearts and minds on Him and all the other earthly things shall be added to you.


God bless you

Timbushi Eunice

My Jewel

My jewel,
My crown,
My sunshine.
Times and seasons may come and go but I want you to know that I am always here for you.


Responsibilities and problems may come tearing but we will keep growing in love.
Fears and insecurities may arise scary but I stay.
It’s been three months now yet it seems like yesterday past, when you called and said I love you.
Closing the door of loneliness and uncertainty was harder when you were not here, but you came holding my arms tight shining firmly through the storm.


The drums are beating harder now, yet the journey keeps getting interesting by the day, glowing with your aroma intoxicates me more.
With you the laugh never grows soar.
This peace and love that overwhelms me never seems to run dry,
The perfect description of my prince charming.


With the signature of the spirit the flaming eyes of your love keeps unveiling the beauty within, exposing every flicking wrickle grown overtime. You keep ravashing every darkness that comes as a threat like it was nothing, my hero!


If God is involved money can not be a barricade to our union, we understand the time of God is best and he will do it for us too in according to his perfect will, so I won’t move a muscle.

Analysis of Ola Rotimi’s “Our husband has gone mad again”.

Question
One features of comedy is presenting serious situation in a light way , analyse how this is found in Ola Rotimi’s “Our husband has gone mad again”.


Introduction
Dramatists have the ethical responsibilities to use their works to shape the future of society. They can do this not only by reflecting the ugly side of society but also by promoting the positive aspects of the people’s way of life that are worth preserving and emulating each dramatist, therefore, tries from his or her own perspective, to use the art to enlighten his or her audience on the goodness, imbalances and shortcomings of society.Joining the struggle and campaign against corruption in Africa, especially in Nigeria, drama and other literary writings have become veritable tools. Dramatists expose corrupt practices in the society through their works. They can also advocate positive changes in the society through their works. In this way, drama contributes meaningfully towards political emancipation and social change. The society is made up of different people; therefore, a playwright has both ethical and pedagogical responsibilities to his or her society (Adeoti, 2007). The book, Our Husband Has Gone Mad Again, by Ola Rotimi is a comedy and the play depicts the naivety and ignorance of a former military major-Rahman Taslim Lekoja-brown in his bid to go into politics. Ola Rotimi can be seen as a very visionary writer who perceived what the political scene in Nigeria and other African nations would be in the nearest future and has therefore decided to take a comic swipe at ideological misfits and opportunists who flood the ever accommodating political landscape of contemporary Africa. The issue of women in politics is also highlighted in the play. All these were achievable through the use of language which the artist cleverly weaved together to produce high comic results.


The Play
Our Husband has Gone Mad Again is a satirical comedy of the political terrain of Africa as well as of those who run it. African politics, the contest for acceptability of the people is an aggressive one. Ola Rotimi being critical of the ills; is out to condemn the corrupt tendencies in Nigerian society through the vehicle of laughter and mockery. It is a comic or mild satire because the play characterizes the actions of some of the characters which tend to make people laugh. Individuals, institutions and the society as a whole are also ridiculed in it.
In the play, we witness an attack on the ex-military personnel in Nigeria attempting to go into civilian politics with the same military mentality. The drama specifically satirizes the political corruption associated with the Nigerian society; the major object or subject of attack and derision in the play is Lejoka-Brown. He is an ex-military officer, a veteran, who believes so much in his military intelligence in outsmarting everybody. Rotimi makes fun of Lejoka-Brown because of his ‘military madness’. The playwright lampoons his protagonist’s idea about politics with military intelligence and sagacity. That is, in fact, why Lejoka-Brown insists that politics is a source of wealth-making. In Our Husband has Gone Mad Again, politics is seen as a profession where one loots public fund, a social transformer and image raiser for whosoever is involved in it at the expense of the masses and national security. In the discussion between Lejoka-Brown and Okonkwo, the former has this to say why he takes to politics:
Lejoka-Brown: are you there? Politics is the
thing now in Nigeria, you want to be famous?
Politics, you want to chop life? No—no— you
want to chop a big share of the national
cake? Na politics (1997).
From the above, it is very clear that Lejoka-Brown’s motive in joining politics is not motivated by his sense of patriotism and service but he sees politics as a means to an end. This informs why he decides to go any length to secure political power. In view of this, Ola Rotimi mirrors the political strategies adopted by the political class to manipulate the electorate and win elections at all cost because of the material gain expected by this class; to them, politics is an investment, and not the process of securing power for good governance, national health and security.In exposing Lejoka-Brown’s inordinate motive, Ola Rotimi is subtly indicting the decadent Nigerian political gladiators. By making jest of Lejoka-Brown, Rotimi is indirectly attacking our greedy, selfish and pleasure-seeking leaders in the Nigerian society. Lejoka-Brown speaks:
It is a war; politics is a war ooo. I am taking
no chance at all. Last time I took things slow
and easy and what happened? I lost a bye
election to a small crab (Our Husband has
Gone Mad Again, 1997).
Lejoka-Brown‘s statement above is ridiculous. Yet it goes to show how crude and ruthless he is. If Lejoka-Brown is taken as a symbolic representation of Nigerian leaders, it would then mean that the playwright is critical about the Nigerian leader’s use of brutal force to achieve political ambition. Also, it is clear that Lejoka-Brown lost in the last political contest, but this time around, he vows he will not take any chances and lose the way he lost the previous time. He, therefore, drown’s ‘surprise and attack’ campaign strategy elicits the playwright’s mockery. Although, Lejoka vigorously explains to his party members the nature of his political strategy, he only succeeds in dramatizing his hollow mentality. According to Lejoka: “gentlemen, our election campaign plan must follow a platform of military strategy known as surprise and attack …” (Our Husband…, 1997). From Lejoka’s campaign plan, he exposes the fact that he is incredibly ridiculous. Rotimi portrays him as a man who fails to understand the difference between a politician and a soldier. It should also be noted that there is as well a satire on those who run African politics. Apart from Okonkwo who we know as a lawyer, we only get to know that there are some other educated elite in the NLP when Lejoka-Brown berates them saying that he does not impress them because he had not been educated at America-Toronto and England- Oxford (Our Husband…, 1997) Lejoka-Brown, the leader had abandoned his flourishing cocoa business to join politics because the nature of our politics is one which easily transforms the political class overnight.
Each time he makes a promise of a better life to Liza he ties it to the material benefits he expects to accrue to himself once he wins the forthcoming elections. Madam Ajanaku who insists that the next leader of NLP should be a female has her daughter, Sikira, in mind as she makes the point. The playwright, therefore, seems to be saying that Nigerian politics and indeed African politics is a strange and funny one, not just because of how it is approached by its participants but also the calibre of those who are at the soul of it. It should also be pointed out that the domineering and tyrannical influence of Lejoka-Brown over his own family, especially his wives, is also satirized. Lejoka-Brown is so over-bearing in his matrimonial home such that one begins to imagine what the situation would look like if he transfers such leadership style to the management of the post he is contesting for. Arrogation and deployment of absolute power in itself is corruption. Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely. This dictatorial tendencies or power absolutism is on its own a form of political corruption and Lejoka-Brown is seriously guilty of that. He acquires women in the play not for the purpose of caring for them but to boost his personal ego, to feather his nest and for his political advantage.


In this regard, Anigala (2007) observes that Lejoka-Brown is presented as a mighty colossus who pervades the political terrain with domineering force and influence. The woman, on the other hand, is conceived as a ‘Lilliputian’ who is completely domesticated. Lejoka-Brown is the boss, who must be obeyed and served. He rides on both political and traditional platforms to wield his absolute power. While he discusses important issues with Okonkwo, Sikira, his wife, runs errands and provides comfort for her lord. Sikira, who must kneel down while greeting her lord, is regarded as a mere property, a thing recently acquired by Lejoka-Brown as a wife for political convenience while mama Rashida has been domiciled by culture.This set-up remains in place with male dominance prevailing. Sikira also takes critical look at her position in the house and returns a harsh verdict on herself – a slave. This verdict is an expression of the despair and frustration arising from the patronizing attitude of Lejoka–Brown. She sees herself as a mere possession acquired by her husband for political expediency. Her frustration is reflective of the plight of women who are purchased, caged and inhibited from political aspiration by a male-dominated society. She speaks, “in this house? A slave that is what I am. Did he marry me because he loves me or because of this crazy politics” (Our Husband…, 1997).This is the prevailing situation in Lejoka-Brown’s house where the ‘long rod’ is wielded threateningly by the macho man; whose word is law. This role can only be discarded, if Sikira rises to a new level of intellectual consciousness that will set her free from the shackles of slavery. Thus, she needs a mentor, who will prod her into obtaining self respect, dignity and independence. These qualities will provide her with the strength and courage, to be able to ‘stand tall’ in the presence of Lejoka-Brown.


The foregoing analysis clearly shows the fate women are subjected to in their matrimonial homes in many parts of Africa, particularly in Nigeria. Apart from the political advantage which Lejoka-Brown wants to gain by getting the woman (that is, Sikira), his high handedness over the women is derided in the drama as an absolute power, which is tantamount to being a corrupted person. Unravelling the evil of acquisition of numerous wives to get political advantage,
Ola Rotimi clearly satirises the polygamous system of marriage in Nigeria by exploring the usual sentiment that easily divides women – and this is envy and jealousy. This often creates the feeling of resentment among women. Ola Rotimi dramatizes the incessant quarrels and arguments between Sikira and her co-wife (rival) Liza who live a dog and cat’s life, constantly fighting one another. Sikira and Liza’s relationship is that of fear and mutual suspicion. Sikira fears that Liza might overshadow her. Sikira thinks that Liza being more educated than her would make the latter more domineering and overbearing than herself. She expresses the fears, thus, “will our husband care for me now that miss world is coming here?” (Our Husband…, 1997).
When Liza eventually arrives into Lejoka–Brown’s house as his most educated wife, Sikira picks quarrels with her at the least provocation. Lejoka-Borwn’s household is in reality a fictional representation of what actually happens in most polygamous families. In extending his satire to such a home, Ola Rotimi is indirectly cautioning prospective polygamists of the consequences of such a marriage form especially acquiring them to fulfil a corrupt political advantage. Politics is life, and human beings being political animals find themselves inextricably linked to the political discourse of their generation. Since drama is a mediator of life, political drama has come to characterize contemporary theatre in modern era and the effect of satirical works such as Our Husband has Gone Mad Again cannot be underestimated. This powerful attribute of drama has been employed by Ola Rotimi to make constructive commentaries on the happenings in society in order to effect some positive changes among men, women and their environment.


Conclusion
Our Husband has Gone Mad Again is, no doubt, a satirical attack on the political and domestic corruption in Nigeria. Many Nigerian playwrights consider it a point of responsibility to comment on and discuss the issue of the excesses of the political leaders and Ola Rotimi is no exception. Until his death, Ola Rotimi was an acknowledged political analyst and a strong advocate of social change. The play is indeed a satirical drama blending a critical attitude with humour and wit for the purpose of improving human institutions or humanity. It holds up a society to ridicule and shows the foolishness of an idea or custom in an amusing manner evoking laughter, scorn or contempt.


Reference
Rotimi, O. (1997). Our Husband has Gone Mad Again. Ibadan: Oxford University Press.
Adeoti, G. (2007). Muse and mimesis: Critical perspective on Ahmed Yerima’s drama. Ibadan, Spectrum Books Limited.
Nwabueze, E. (2011). Studies in dramatic literature. Enugu: ABIC Books and Equipment Ltd.
Oha, A.C. (2008). ENG 208-The African novel.Victoria Island, Lagos: National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) Publications

The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born- Analysis

Introduction
The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born is the debut novel that is catapulted by the Ghanaian writer Ayei Kwei Armah into the limelight. The novel is generally a satirical attack on the Ghanaian society during Kwame Nkrumah’s regime and the period immediately after independence in the 1960s. It is often claimed to rank with “Things Fall Apart” as one of the high points of post-colonial African Literature. The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born was published in 1968 by Houghton Mifflin, and then republished in the influential Heinemann African Writers Series in 1969. The novel tells the story of a nameless man who struggles to reconcile himself with the reality of post-independence Ghana. He is a railway freight clerk that attempts to hold out against the pressures that impel him toward corruption in both his family and his country.

Background of the Author/Work
Ayei Kwei Armah was born in Takoradi, Ghana, in 1939 and was educated at Achimota High School, Groton School and Harvard University. He has worked as translator, editor, television script-writer and lecturer at the National University of Lesotho. His published novels which includes: Fragments, Why are we so Blessed,Two Thousand Seasons, The Healers and The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born.

CHARACTERIZATION
The protagonist is an unnamed railway freight clerk. He is portrayed as a lone ranger in his stance against corruption. He faces intense pressures to compromise his self-entrenched value system. The uncelebrated hero lives like a stranger in his own home where even his good natured wife, described as, ‘ a very polite woman…’(p.55) makes him ‘feel like a criminal …’ for failing to do what everyone else does in order to get enough money for their upkeep (P.54). His wife calls him, ‘the Chichidodo’. That is, a bird that feeds on maggots, but hates the excreta, which produces the worms. As he weighs her words, he develops low self-esteem and occasionally seeks succour from Teacher, the only man that seems to understand him. Sometimes, he is bogged down in self-pity, as he wonders at his pathetic condition and berates himself for being a mediocre. The hero is openly despised for his uncompromising stance against corruption. The writer presents him as a nonentity without a name. The villain, Joseph Koomson, his former classmate, has accolades such as ‘His Excellency,’ ‘the Minister,’ ‘Brother Joe’ and so on. The protagonist is a queer character. His personal philosophy appears inexplicable, but can be deduced from the maxims he keenly identifies with such as the lyrics of the song on page 51:
Let them go.
I will travel slowly,
And I too will arrive.
However, the hero doubts the possibility of his arrival as he weighs the odds against him. Another such maxim is the one that forms the title of the novel, The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born which is drawn from an inscription on a vehicle. He feels alienated from the society as others consider his convictions quixotic. His wife, Oyo, merely tolerates him, but idolizes his rich friend, the corrupt politician, Koomson. The mother-in-law taunts him for failing to cater for his family like a ‘proper man’. She makes a caricature of him, as a dismal failure. Teacher, the only man that seems to understand him lives a cocooned life, refusing to venture out of his shell into the decadent society. Despite his obvious intelligence and uncanny ability to discern situations, the protagonist resigns to fate, accepting defeat.
The characters includes:
The Man
Oyo
Teacher
Joseph Koomson
Estella Koomson
Sister Maanan
The man, deliberately given the generality of anonymity, a clerk who works for the nationalized railway system in Ghana. He and his wife, Oyo, and their children live in comparative poverty because of the man’s unflinching determination not to accept bribes but to live on his inadequate salary in a society that finds such behavior incomprehensible. In spite of the temptations that come to him from every side, the constant nagging of his bitter wife, and his own awareness of the hardships his honesty imposes upon his children, he maintains his unalterable moral stance. His determination is in some measure justified when a coup destroys the regime and the corrupt are arrested, but as he begins to rejoice in the vigorous national purge of corruption, he witnesses the same old crookedness immediately reactivated. the man represents, to an exaggerated degree, an idealized portrait of a truly noble man in a degraded society.The man represents the honest members of society in Ghana. Armah uses him as the main character to depict what the life of the ordinary Ghanaian citizen looked like. The man has a meagre job as a clerk and struggles to feed his wife, Oyo, and his children. Despite being tempted by numerous people—including his politician friend, Koomson—to take bribes and enrich himself quickly, he refuses to be tainted.
Oyo, the man’s wife. She has no sympathy for her husband’s honesty and all but despises him for it. Indifferent to the principles involved, she can only see how well others are managing as a result of their acquiescence to wrongdoing. She has a deep envy of the successful and yearns for the luxuries that other women enjoy. Only at the end does she commend her husband when she sees the painful consequences of corruption that come when the criminals are arrested.Oyo is the man’s wife and someone that admires wealth, regardless of how it was gained. She represents those poorer Ghanaians who have no problem with corruption or ill-gotten wealth when they consider their current situation. She always blames her husband for her suffering.
Koomson is Nkrumah’s socialist minister and the man’s former classmate. He represents the corrupt and selfish political system. He lives in comfort with his wife, Estella, and forgets about the plight of the poor. He does nothing to benefit society.
The teacher is a middle-aged man full of wisdom who has given up on life and sees no hope for Ghana. He represents the citizens who thought life would change after the colonizers left, only to be disappointed. He is also the man’s friend, and they occasionally discuss Ghana’s political situation.
Estella is Koomson’s wife and someone that’s used to luxury.

Related Questions
What are some quotes from The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What are the themes of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is a summary of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is the moral of the story in The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is the theme of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born”?
Short notes on the characters Joseph Koomson,The Man,Oyo,Estella.
What is the roles of Maanan, the man and Teacher in Ayei Kwei Armah’s The beautiful Ones Are Not?

SETTING
The setting of the novel is Ghana in the twilight of the reign of Kwame Nkuruma and the early days of the military regime that succeeded it. The novel is a satirical attack on the Ghanaian society during this era. The civilian political actors had abandoned the socialist ideals upon which they leveraged to come to power. The Pan-African philosophy of Kwame Nkrumah during this period, was also evidently thwarted to serve the pecuniary interest of his cohorts. Corruption reeked to high heavens. After the change of guard occasioned by a military coup, corruption remained the bane of this typical African society as revealed in the novel. The setting is also contemporary as the ugly situation remains unabated in most African countries with those who claim to be fighters of corruption turning out as the worst culprits. The society lampoons nonconformists, as ‘… chichidodos …whose entrails are not hard enough for the national game.’(p.55)

THE PLOT
The unnamed protagonist, referred to as “the man”, works at a railway station and is approached with a bribe; when he refuses, his wife is furious and he can’t help feeling guilty despite his innocence. The action takes place between 1965’s Passion Week and 25 February 1966 – the day after the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s president.
The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born revolves around an unnamed railway freight clerk who faces intense pressures impelling him to compromise his values and patriotic convictions by joining the corruption train, which seems to have everyone else on board. The protagonist struggles to reconcile his personal convictions with the expectations of his loved ones and society. He faces unwarranted attacks, even as he commutes to work. On a particular occasion, a bus driver contemptuously spits at him. At the office, his patriotic disposition – as he dedicates himself to assigned duties and refuses to give or take bribes, makes him an irritant to co-workers. Although ‘the man’ remains an uncelebrated hero all through the story, a twist that vindicates him occurs towards the end of the narrative. The military seizes power as it overthrows the overtly corrupt civilian government. The once detached friend, Koomson, runs to the man’s poverty-ridden house and escapes through a smelly latrine which he could not condescend to use during a visit in his days of power. On this occasion, the potbellied politician oozes a stench that is so unbearable that Oyo, his erstwhile admirer, remarks, ‘He stinks…’ and says to her husband,’…I am glad that you never become like him’. (p.165)

THEMATIC TREATMENT
The theme of corruption: The novel portrays the central theme of corruption as the bane of the society. The theme of corruption is explored along with other sub-themes such as poverty, social inequality, hero- worshipping, political instability, economic sabotage, solitude and retributive justice. The writer explores corruption as a central theme through the use of imagery, creating the repulsive picture of overfed politicians whom he describes with derogatory words such as ‘constipating’, ‘farting’, ‘a group of bellies’, ‘flatulent’, ‘stupid’, ‘idiots’, et cetera. Corruption is revealed in the lifestyle of self-serving public officers, the complicity of the general public in corrupt practices and an eyesore with unsavoury images of filth and decay. The entire society is presented as being irredeemably corrupt and stinky. The streets, public places, offices and private homes, particularly where the poor reside, are depicted in nauseating images to reveal the deplorable state of the nation.The writer decries the pecuniary disposition of most people as their leaning towards materialism erodes them of the values that account for meaningful development in any society. The entire Ghanaian society is so engulfed in the corruption quagmire that only the corrupt are celebrated. The novel reveals that corruption is the bane of most countries where as a cankerworm, it feasts on the fabrics of every segment of the society. The protagonist is relegated to the background even in his family. His wife adores his corruptly enriched former classmate, Koomson, wishing her family could live in such opulence with exotic cars and unrivalled affluence. Her mother berates the man as a pathological failure, comparing him to the same Koomson. Ironically, it is revealed in the novel that Koomson was dull and stupid in school. He becomes an instant success the moment he joins politics, becomes a minister and begins to embezzle public fund. Armah spares no strata in his condemnation as he reveals that flatulent politicians like the Minister, Joseph Koomson, are not only buoyed by greed, but tacitly encouraged by majority of the populace and sycophants who sing their praises. Honest persons like the railway freight clerk are ridiculed for refusing to conform to the norm – accepting a life of bribery and corruption, and compromising their value system. Generally, the people pay lip service to the fight against corruption. They excitedly welcome a new government, knowing full well that the coup plotters would be worse than their predecessors.
The influence of imperialism: The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born is a soul-searching novel written in response to “the rot which imprisoned everything.” The influence of imperialism on the new government of Ghana cannot be overlooked and even though “the sons of the nation” are controlling their beloved country, there are still “palms getting greased” but there is no excuse any more. They cannot or do not want to break free from the capitalist-style system which profits them but leaves others destitute. The novel is a personal account of one, significantly unnamed, man’s struggle to fight against this corruption, making corruption, and the institutionalizing of it, a major theme of the book.
The theme of Social Inequality: The description of the banister as the man ascends the stairs in his office block talks of the “organic” feeling of the wood and yet it leaves him thinking of all the “diseased skin” that has touched the banister, and so, for him it represents all that represses the human spirit. He accepts that “loneliness” will result as he cannot win. The unnamed man must suffer the humiliation of being compared to his more successful colleague and old school friend Koomson who is idolized by the man’s wife and family. As a junior government official, it would be easy for the unnamed man to advance his career but to do so would mean accepting bribes just like Koomson. He experiences isolation and rejection and his family accuse him of being disloyal because he fails to provide adequately for them.
The theme of Poverty: It is a sad fact that” it costs you more money if you go to the police” meaning that to get their co-operation, there will inevitably be more money changing hands which ironically only contributes to and extends the corruption. The result is a “living death” whether caused by poverty or corruption. The man is expected to behave like his counterparts because “if you work in the same office you can eat from the same bowl” he is told and he is the one who is made to feel guilty in his refusal.
The theme of poverty: The novel ultimately reveal how the man’s determination is his saving grace and is his salvation. He will save Koomson and earn his wife’s respect but he knows that the cycle of corruption will continue. To the reader, however, he is the “beautiful ” one. The subject matter is the story of a Man who struggles to remain clean when everyone else around him has succumbed to ‘rot’.In the end he could not change the system instead he aids one of the corrupt government officials to escape. This further amplifies the title of the novel which states that the beautiful ones are not yet born. It means that there are no honest citizens with firm characters who can change the system.
The theme of bad leadership and the negative effects of capitalism. The capitalist system encourages individual acquisition of excessive wealth. The leaders who are in the minority amass wealth for their personal aggrandizement while the citizens who are in the majority wallow in abject poverty. They therefore explore every opportunity to make quick money in fraudulent ways. The bus conductor is ready to cheat and the worker in the office does not blink an eye as he accepts bribe from the merchant and the merchant does not see anything wrong with that. On the contrary, he is spiteful of Man who refuses to accept bribe from him.The societal ill of corruption which the leaders profess to wipe out ends up swallowing the leaders as they get tainted with greed and corruption, in most cases, more than ever.

The Independence Of Ghana as portrayed in the novel.
In The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born, Armah showed his deep concern about greed and political corruption in a newly independent African nation. Armah’s works exhibit Western influences, as they show the plight of alienated heroes in search of values in a society seemingly devoid of meaning.
Set in Sekondi-Takoradi, one of Ghana’s major port cities, The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born chronicles the life of a railway clerk who routinely must make hard choices between easy money that would enable him to provide more adequately for his family and his own conscience, which disallows his acceptance of bribes as a means of getting ahead. Armah considers corruption and opportunism as responsible for the failure of the nationalist movement, since newly elected leaders, once they have risen to power, become no less predisposed than were their colonialist predecessors to secure their own positions through unethical means or at the expense of the masses they were elected to serve.
The characters are variations of the two types of people who make up Ghanaian society in the 1960’s, the “hard” and the “weak,” at least as that society is perceived by the man and his Teacher. The man continually berates himself for being among the weak, yet knows that his inability to join the corrupt, successful ones is not entirely a failure of nerve. Still, the novel is not primarily an account of his inner struggle between the two impulses, the one toward the “gleam” of wealth and power, the other toward the clarity and purity of the moral life; rather, it is a lament over the existential situation. He knows the gleam is a false beacon; it will offer no satisfying solution but will instead kill the soul. Yet he sees the entire society fascinated by it, drawn to it, and lulled morally to sleep by it. To be honest in the eyes of society is to be not only stupid and naive but also uncooperative. ungracious, and insensitive to the needs of others. The man’s understanding of the topsy-turvy value system is never in question, but his ability to maintain his integrity is. For one thing, he begins to wonder if, in fact, the world offers any evidence of “corruption” being “unnatural.” Perhaps his inner sense of moral distinctions is an illusion and the most grotesque aberrations of nature are part of the order of things. He feels himself caught up in the never-ending cycle of birth and decay, during which only one brief instant produces something beautiful. What makes the stress almost unbearable, however, is the pressure he gets from his wife, Oyo. She is a victim of the gleam. His soul is not free; it is morally bound up in another person and must make decisions that affect her and the children. Her judgment of him means that he never has a “home” to which he can return.
The final act of the novel, however, changes both her and him. When she sees Koomson reduced to a whimpering, timid, immobile bundle of blubber, she looks at her husband with pride and respect. Her look and Koomson’s fall reaffirm the man in his sense of moral superiority to the society. His final act of courage in helping Koomson escape is an act of heroism.
A quote from Chapter 6:
“And where is my solid ground these days? Let us say just that the cycle from birth to decay has been short. Short, brief. But otherwise not at all unusual. And even in the decline into the end there are things that remind the longing mind of old beginnings and hold out the promise of new ones, things even like your despair itself. I have heard this pain before, only then it was multiplied many, many times, but that may only be because at that time I was not so alone, so far apart. Maybe there are other lonely voices despairing now. I will not be entranced by the voice, even if it should swell as it did in the days of hope. I will not be entranced, since I have seen the destruction of the promises it made. But I shall not resist it either. I will be like a cork. It is so surprising, is it not, how even the worst happenings of the past acquire a sweetness in the memory. Old harsh distresses are now merely pictures and tastes which hurt no more, like itching scars which can only give pleasure now. Strange, because when I can think soberly about it all, with out pushing any later joys into the deeper past, I can remember that things were terrible then. When the war was over the soldiers came back to homes broken in their absence and they themselves brought murder in their hearts and gave it to those nearest them. I saw it, not very clearly, because I had no way of understanding it, but it frightened me. We had gone on marches of victory and I do not think there was anyone mean enough in spirit to ask whether we knew what we were celebrating. Whose victory? Ours? It did not matter. We marched, and only a dishonest fool will look back on his boyhood and say he knew even then that there was no meaning in any of it. It is so funny now, to remember that we all thought we were welcoming victory. Or perhaps there is nothing funny here at all, and it is only that victory itself happens to be the identical twin of defeat.”

Summary
The events of the novel take place between Passion Week in 1965 and February 25, 1966, the day after the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first president. On the political level, they describe the failure of a purportedly socialistic government, which is, in fact, as capitalistic as the white colonial regime it replaced. The new black leaders with white souls have, according to Ayei Kwei Armah, used their positions of power for personal gain. The corruption has filtered down to all levels of society, all economic relationships being based on intimidation, bribery, and fraud. What makes the society appear so bleak is that Armah reports it through the eyes of a rare individual who has retained his integrity: the man, an unnamed protagonist, has failed professionally because he has been too soft; he has been unable to play the bribery game. The only heroes in the society—that is, the only ones who succeed—are the hard ones who no longer feel moral or emotional hypocrisy. For the man, who speaks for Armah, the leaders of society are no different from the old African chiefs who sold their people in the slave trade for the trinkets of white society.

The novel divides neatly into two large parts. The first, which moves at an agonizingly slow pace, traces the daily routine of the man through a typical working day, beginning with the usual bus ride to the railway administration building where he is a traffic control clerk. The day is boringly uneventful, but Armah punctuates his narrative with depressing descriptions of the environment, sights and smells of human excrement, spittle, filth, and graffiti, relieved only occasionally by the beauty of some natural phenomenon, the sky or the sea, as yet uncontaminated by man’s touch. In the afternoon, a timber man comes to offer the man a bribe, but he leaves unsatisfied. After work the man meets an old acquaintance from school, now a government Minister, Joseph Koomson, and his wife, Estella. Koomson is one of the hard ones who have succeeded. The man invites the Koomsons for dinner t

Introduction
The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born is the debut novel that is catapulted by the Ghanaian writer Ayei Kwei Armah into the limelight. The novel is generally a satirical attack on the Ghanaian society during Kwame Nkrumah’s regime and the period immediately after independence in the 1960s. It is often claimed to rank with “Things Fall Apart” as one of the high points of post-colonial African Literature. The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born was published in 1968 by Houghton Mifflin, and then republished in the influential Heinemann African Writers Series in 1969. The novel tells the story of a nameless man who struggles to reconcile himself with the reality of post-independence Ghana. He is a railway freight clerk that attempts to hold out against the pressures that impel him toward corruption in both his family and his country.

Background of the Author/Work
Ayei Kwei Armah was born in Takoradi, Ghana, in 1939 and was educated at Achimota High School, Groton School and Harvard University. He has worked as translator, editor, television script-writer and lecturer at the National University of Lesotho. His published novels which includes: Fragments, Why are we so Blessed,Two Thousand Seasons, The Healers and The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born.

CHARACTERIZATION
The protagonist is an unnamed railway freight clerk. He is portrayed as a lone ranger in his stance against corruption. He faces intense pressures to compromise his self-entrenched value system. The uncelebrated hero lives like a stranger in his own home where even his good natured wife, described as, ‘ a very polite woman…’(p.55) makes him ‘feel like a criminal …’ for failing to do what everyone else does in order to get enough money for their upkeep (P.54). His wife calls him, ‘the Chichidodo’. That is, a bird that feeds on maggots, but hates the excreta, which produces the worms. As he weighs her words, he develops low self-esteem and occasionally seeks succour from Teacher, the only man that seems to understand him. Sometimes, he is bogged down in self-pity, as he wonders at his pathetic condition and berates himself for being a mediocre. The hero is openly despised for his uncompromising stance against corruption. The writer presents him as a nonentity without a name. The villain, Joseph Koomson, his former classmate, has accolades such as ‘His Excellency,’ ‘the Minister,’ ‘Brother Joe’ and so on. The protagonist is a queer character. His personal philosophy appears inexplicable, but can be deduced from the maxims he keenly identifies with such as the lyrics of the song on page 51:
Let them go.
I will travel slowly,
And I too will arrive.
However, the hero doubts the possibility of his arrival as he weighs the odds against him. Another such maxim is the one that forms the title of the novel, The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born which is drawn from an inscription on a vehicle. He feels alienated from the society as others consider his convictions quixotic. His wife, Oyo, merely tolerates him, but idolizes his rich friend, the corrupt politician, Koomson. The mother-in-law taunts him for failing to cater for his family like a ‘proper man’. She makes a caricature of him, as a dismal failure. Teacher, the only man that seems to understand him lives a cocooned life, refusing to venture out of his shell into the decadent society. Despite his obvious intelligence and uncanny ability to discern situations, the protagonist resigns to fate, accepting defeat.
The characters includes:
The Man
Oyo
Teacher
Joseph Koomson
Estella Koomson
Sister Maanan
The man, deliberately given the generality of anonymity, a clerk who works for the nationalized railway system in Ghana. He and his wife, Oyo, and their children live in comparative poverty because of the man’s unflinching determination not to accept bribes but to live on his inadequate salary in a society that finds such behavior incomprehensible. In spite of the temptations that come to him from every side, the constant nagging of his bitter wife, and his own awareness of the hardships his honesty imposes upon his children, he maintains his unalterable moral stance. His determination is in some measure justified when a coup destroys the regime and the corrupt are arrested, but as he begins to rejoice in the vigorous national purge of corruption, he witnesses the same old crookedness immediately reactivated. the man represents, to an exaggerated degree, an idealized portrait of a truly noble man in a degraded society.The man represents the honest members of society in Ghana. Armah uses him as the main character to depict what the life of the ordinary Ghanaian citizen looked like. The man has a meagre job as a clerk and struggles to feed his wife, Oyo, and his children. Despite being tempted by numerous people—including his politician friend, Koomson—to take bribes and enrich himself quickly, he refuses to be tainted.
Oyo, the man’s wife. She has no sympathy for her husband’s honesty and all but despises him for it. Indifferent to the principles involved, she can only see how well others are managing as a result of their acquiescence to wrongdoing. She has a deep envy of the successful and yearns for the luxuries that other women enjoy. Only at the end does she commend her husband when she sees the painful consequences of corruption that come when the criminals are arrested.Oyo is the man’s wife and someone that admires wealth, regardless of how it was gained. She represents those poorer Ghanaians who have no problem with corruption or ill-gotten wealth when they consider their current situation. She always blames her husband for her suffering.
Koomson is Nkrumah’s socialist minister and the man’s former classmate. He represents the corrupt and selfish political system. He lives in comfort with his wife, Estella, and forgets about the plight of the poor. He does nothing to benefit society.
The teacher is a middle-aged man full of wisdom who has given up on life and sees no hope for Ghana. He represents the citizens who thought life would change after the colonizers left, only to be disappointed. He is also the man’s friend, and they occasionally discuss Ghana’s political situation.
Estella is Koomson’s wife and someone that’s used to luxury.

Related Questions
What are some quotes from The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What are the themes of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is a summary of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is the moral of the story in The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born?
What is the theme of The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born”?
Short notes on the characters Joseph Koomson,The Man,Oyo,Estella.
What is the roles of Maanan, the man and Teacher in Ayei Kwei Armah’s The beautiful Ones Are Not?

SETTING
The setting of the novel is Ghana in the twilight of the reign of Kwame Nkuruma and the early days of the military regime that succeeded it. The novel is a satirical attack on the Ghanaian society during this era. The civilian political actors had abandoned the socialist ideals upon which they leveraged to come to power. The Pan-African philosophy of Kwame Nkrumah during this period, was also evidently thwarted to serve the pecuniary interest of his cohorts. Corruption reeked to high heavens. After the change of guard occasioned by a military coup, corruption remained the bane of this typical African society as revealed in the novel. The setting is also contemporary as the ugly situation remains unabated in most African countries with those who claim to be fighters of corruption turning out as the worst culprits. The society lampoons nonconformists, as ‘… chichidodos …whose entrails are not hard enough for the national game.’(p.55)

THE PLOT
The unnamed protagonist, referred to as “the man”, works at a railway station and is approached with a bribe; when he refuses, his wife is furious and he can’t help feeling guilty despite his innocence. The action takes place between 1965’s Passion Week and 25 February 1966 – the day after the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s president.
The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born revolves around an unnamed railway freight clerk who faces intense pressures impelling him to compromise his values and patriotic convictions by joining the corruption train, which seems to have everyone else on board. The protagonist struggles to reconcile his personal convictions with the expectations of his loved ones and society. He faces unwarranted attacks, even as he commutes to work. On a particular occasion, a bus driver contemptuously spits at him. At the office, his patriotic disposition – as he dedicates himself to assigned duties and refuses to give or take bribes, makes him an irritant to co-workers. Although ‘the man’ remains an uncelebrated hero all through the story, a twist that vindicates him occurs towards the end of the narrative. The military seizes power as it overthrows the overtly corrupt civilian government. The once detached friend, Koomson, runs to the man’s poverty-ridden house and escapes through a smelly latrine which he could not condescend to use during a visit in his days of power. On this occasion, the potbellied politician oozes a stench that is so unbearable that Oyo, his erstwhile admirer, remarks, ‘He stinks…’ and says to her husband,’…I am glad that you never become like him’. (p.165)

THEMATIC TREATMENT
The theme of corruption: The novel portrays the central theme of corruption as the bane of the society. The theme of corruption is explored along with other sub-themes such as poverty, social inequality, hero- worshipping, political instability, economic sabotage, solitude and retributive justice. The writer explores corruption as a central theme through the use of imagery, creating the repulsive picture of overfed politicians whom he describes with derogatory words such as ‘constipating’, ‘farting’, ‘a group of bellies’, ‘flatulent’, ‘stupid’, ‘idiots’, et cetera. Corruption is revealed in the lifestyle of self-serving public officers, the complicity of the general public in corrupt practices and an eyesore with unsavoury images of filth and decay. The entire society is presented as being irredeemably corrupt and stinky. The streets, public places, offices and private homes, particularly where the poor reside, are depicted in nauseating images to reveal the deplorable state of the nation.The writer decries the pecuniary disposition of most people as their leaning towards materialism erodes them of the values that account for meaningful development in any society. The entire Ghanaian society is so engulfed in the corruption quagmire that only the corrupt are celebrated. The novel reveals that corruption is the bane of most countries where as a cankerworm, it feasts on the fabrics of every segment of the society. The protagonist is relegated to the background even in his family. His wife adores his corruptly enriched former classmate, Koomson, wishing her family could live in such opulence with exotic cars and unrivalled affluence. Her mother berates the man as a pathological failure, comparing him to the same Koomson. Ironically, it is revealed in the novel that Koomson was dull and stupid in school. He becomes an instant success the moment he joins politics, becomes a minister and begins to embezzle public fund. Armah spares no strata in his condemnation as he reveals that flatulent politicians like the Minister, Joseph Koomson, are not only buoyed by greed, but tacitly encouraged by majority of the populace and sycophants who sing their praises. Honest persons like the railway freight clerk are ridiculed for refusing to conform to the norm – accepting a life of bribery and corruption, and compromising their value system. Generally, the people pay lip service to the fight against corruption. They excitedly welcome a new government, knowing full well that the coup plotters would be worse than their predecessors.
The influence of imperialism: The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born is a soul-searching novel written in response to “the rot which imprisoned everything.” The influence of imperialism on the new government of Ghana cannot be overlooked and even though “the sons of the nation” are controlling their beloved country, there are still “palms getting greased” but there is no excuse any more. They cannot or do not want to break free from the capitalist-style system which profits them but leaves others destitute. The novel is a personal account of one, significantly unnamed, man’s struggle to fight against this corruption, making corruption, and the institutionalizing of it, a major theme of the book.
The theme of Social Inequality: The description of the banister as the man ascends the stairs in his office block talks of the “organic” feeling of the wood and yet it leaves him thinking of all the “diseased skin” that has touched the banister, and so, for him it represents all that represses the human spirit. He accepts that “loneliness” will result as he cannot win. The unnamed man must suffer the humiliation of being compared to his more successful colleague and old school friend Koomson who is idolized by the man’s wife and family. As a junior government official, it would be easy for the unnamed man to advance his career but to do so would mean accepting bribes just like Koomson. He experiences isolation and rejection and his family accuse him of being disloyal because he fails to provide adequately for them.
The theme of Poverty: It is a sad fact that” it costs you more money if you go to the police” meaning that to get their co-operation, there will inevitably be more money changing hands which ironically only contributes to and extends the corruption. The result is a “living death” whether caused by poverty or corruption. The man is expected to behave like his counterparts because “if you work in the same office you can eat from the same bowl” he is told and he is the one who is made to feel guilty in his refusal.
The theme of poverty: The novel ultimately reveal how the man’s determination is his saving grace and is his salvation. He will save Koomson and earn his wife’s respect but he knows that the cycle of corruption will continue. To the reader, however, he is the “beautiful ” one. The subject matter is the story of a Man who struggles to remain clean when everyone else around him has succumbed to ‘rot’.In the end he could not change the system instead he aids one of the corrupt government officials to escape. This further amplifies the title of the novel which states that the beautiful ones are not yet born. It means that there are no honest citizens with firm characters who can change the system.
The theme of bad leadership and the negative effects of capitalism. The capitalist system encourages individual acquisition of excessive wealth. The leaders who are in the minority amass wealth for their personal aggrandizement while the citizens who are in the majority wallow in abject poverty. They therefore explore every opportunity to make quick money in fraudulent ways. The bus conductor is ready to cheat and the worker in the office does not blink an eye as he accepts bribe from the merchant and the merchant does not see anything wrong with that. On the contrary, he is spiteful of Man who refuses to accept bribe from him.The societal ill of corruption which the leaders profess to wipe out ends up swallowing the leaders as they get tainted with greed and corruption, in most cases, more than ever.

The Independence Of Ghana as portrayed in the novel.
In The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born, Armah showed his deep concern about greed and political corruption in a newly independent African nation. Armah’s works exhibit Western influences, as they show the plight of alienated heroes in search of values in a society seemingly devoid of meaning.
Set in Sekondi-Takoradi, one of Ghana’s major port cities, The beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born chronicles the life of a railway clerk who routinely must make hard choices between easy money that would enable him to provide more adequately for his family and his own conscience, which disallows his acceptance of bribes as a means of getting ahead. Armah considers corruption and opportunism as responsible for the failure of the nationalist movement, since newly elected leaders, once they have risen to power, become no less predisposed than were their colonialist predecessors to secure their own positions through unethical means or at the expense of the masses they were elected to serve.
The characters are variations of the two types of people who make up Ghanaian society in the 1960’s, the “hard” and the “weak,” at least as that society is perceived by the man and his Teacher. The man continually berates himself for being among the weak, yet knows that his inability to join the corrupt, successful ones is not entirely a failure of nerve. Still, the novel is not primarily an account of his inner struggle between the two impulses, the one toward the “gleam” of wealth and power, the other toward the clarity and purity of the moral life; rather, it is a lament over the existential situation. He knows the gleam is a false beacon; it will offer no satisfying solution but will instead kill the soul. Yet he sees the entire society fascinated by it, drawn to it, and lulled morally to sleep by it. To be honest in the eyes of society is to be not only stupid and naive but also uncooperative. ungracious, and insensitive to the needs of others. The man’s understanding of the topsy-turvy value system is never in question, but his ability to maintain his integrity is. For one thing, he begins to wonder if, in fact, the world offers any evidence of “corruption” being “unnatural.” Perhaps his inner sense of moral distinctions is an illusion and the most grotesque aberrations of nature are part of the order of things. He feels himself caught up in the never-ending cycle of birth and decay, during which only one brief instant produces something beautiful. What makes the stress almost unbearable, however, is the pressure he gets from his wife, Oyo. She is a victim of the gleam. His soul is not free; it is morally bound up in another person and must make decisions that affect her and the children. Her judgment of him means that he never has a “home” to which he can return.
The final act of the novel, however, changes both her and him. When she sees Koomson reduced to a whimpering, timid, immobile bundle of blubber, she looks at her husband with pride and respect. Her look and Koomson’s fall reaffirm the man in his sense of moral superiority to the society. His final act of courage in helping Koomson escape is an act of heroism.
A quote from Chapter 6:
“And where is my solid ground these days? Let us say just that the cycle from birth to decay has been short. Short, brief. But otherwise not at all unusual. And even in the decline into the end there are things that remind the longing mind of old beginnings and hold out the promise of new ones, things even like your despair itself. I have heard this pain before, only then it was multiplied many, many times, but that may only be because at that time I was not so alone, so far apart. Maybe there are other lonely voices despairing now. I will not be entranced by the voice, even if it should swell as it did in the days of hope. I will not be entranced, since I have seen the destruction of the promises it made. But I shall not resist it either. I will be like a cork. It is so surprising, is it not, how even the worst happenings of the past acquire a sweetness in the memory. Old harsh distresses are now merely pictures and tastes which hurt no more, like itching scars which can only give pleasure now. Strange, because when I can think soberly about it all, with out pushing any later joys into the deeper past, I can remember that things were terrible then. When the war was over the soldiers came back to homes broken in their absence and they themselves brought murder in their hearts and gave it to those nearest them. I saw it, not very clearly, because I had no way of understanding it, but it frightened me. We had gone on marches of victory and I do not think there was anyone mean enough in spirit to ask whether we knew what we were celebrating. Whose victory? Ours? It did not matter. We marched, and only a dishonest fool will look back on his boyhood and say he knew even then that there was no meaning in any of it. It is so funny now, to remember that we all thought we were welcoming victory. Or perhaps there is nothing funny here at all, and it is only that victory itself happens to be the identical twin of defeat.”

Summary
The events of the novel take place between Passion Week in 1965 and February 25, 1966, the day after the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first president. On the political level, they describe the failure of a purportedly socialistic government, which is, in fact, as capitalistic as the white colonial regime it replaced. The new black leaders with white souls have, according to Ayei Kwei Armah, used their positions of power for personal gain. The corruption has filtered down to all levels of society, all economic relationships being based on intimidation, bribery, and fraud. What makes the society appear so bleak is that Armah reports it through the eyes of a rare individual who has retained his integrity: the man, an unnamed protagonist, has failed professionally because he has been too soft; he has been unable to play the bribery game. The only heroes in the society—that is, the only ones who succeed—are the hard ones who no longer feel moral or emotional hypocrisy. For the man, who speaks for Armah, the leaders of society are no different from the old African chiefs who sold their people in the slave trade for the trinkets of white society.

The novel divides neatly into two large parts. The first, which moves at an agonizingly slow pace, traces the daily routine of the man through a typical working day, beginning with the usual bus ride to the railway administration building where he is a traffic control clerk. The day is boringly uneventful, but Armah punctuates his narrative with depressing descriptions of the environment, sights and smells of human excrement, spittle, filth, and graffiti, relieved only occasionally by the beauty of some natural phenomenon, the sky or the sea, as yet uncontaminated by man’s touch. In the afternoon, a timber man comes to offer the man a bribe, but he leaves unsatisfied. After work the man meets an old acquaintance from school, now a government Minister, Joseph Koomson, and his wife, Estella. Koomson is one of the hard ones who have succeeded. The man invites the Koomsons for dinner the following Sunday evening. (The visit will initiate the events in the second part of the novel.)
The man’s return home on the bus completes the workday but hardly ends the day for him.

CONCLUSION
The novel treats the subjects of the 1960 concerning Africa or Africans, power play at public and personal levels, the evils of capitalism, revolutions, and leadership, but these issues are still contemporary in many African societies.The events of the novel take place between Passion Week in 1965 and February 25, 1966, the day after the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first president. On the political level, they describe the failure of a purportedly socialistic government, which is, in fact, as capitalistic as the white colonial regime it replaced. The new black leaders with white souls have, according to Ayei Kwei Armah, used their positions of power for personal gain. The corruption has filtered down to all levels of society and economic relationships are based on intimidation and bribery.
In this article, we have presented an African novel that treats socio-political issues that face many African states. The author insists that there is no hope yet for the amelioration of these issues and the entrenchment of social justice because the beautiful ones are not yet born.

References
https://www.wikipedia.com/the beautiful ones are not yet born…
https://www.enotes.com/topics/beautyful-ones-not-yet-born…
https://www.enotes.com/topics/beautyful-ones-not-yet-born…
https://www.enotes.com/topics/beautyful-ones-not-yet-born…

Be rich in good deeds.

Cease every opportunity to do show love where there’s pain – forgiveness, injury – pardon, doubt – faith, darkness – light, sadness – joy, hostility – kindness, curse – bless to the hungry – food.


For in this little acts of love is the father glorified. We have gone past the old testament laws of an eye for an eye a tooth for a tooth. It’s no longer for you to pay evil to evil, but repay evil with good.


We have come to mount Zion the city of God and place of deliverance. The deliverance starts from you and I reflecting what Christ meant when he said in Matthew 5, to love even your enemies and pray for those who persecute you. He said so because no man is sufficient in himself. God said the righteousness of the world is but a filthy rag before him, so none can say he is righteous. We are because he is.


It’s not in our natural character to do all these, and that was why he sent forth his very presence to dwell within us, so that we can act as perfect as our heavenly father is.

Strive as much as you can to live at peace with God and with your fellow man.
Leave vengeance for God.

Do you deserve it?


Often times when situation of self abasement presents itself, the first thing to consider before putting yourself above others is, do I deserve grace?


We are carried away with the righteousness and love of God for us that we tend to neglect the fact that the same God is rich unto us all. He made the same grace available for all not minding the gender, the color, the race.


And if he didn’t chose to love us while we were yet sinners, we wouldn’t have been where we are now. Who are we to point fingers at others?

If he could overlook our faults and still sanctified us by the blood then who are we to think he can’t replicate such in the life of that rascal in your street or for that prostitute.


Don’t allow your past rob you of his loving presence, like the case of the prodigal son, he is always waiting for you to turn to him and accept his help. Only the devil condemns people, God only convicts you of sins and offers you a way to be better and live in righteousness.


God’s grace is sufficient and ready available unto all who embrace him. And it’s at our weakest and lowliest moment that his help is excellent.
We don’t deserve his grace but he freely gave us, so we can freely give it to others.